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This Week’s Project:

Howdy guys, hope you’re settling in to the new year with ease. We’re excited to be crafting with one of our favorite items this week: tags. Some refer to these as luggage tags, the actual box I purchased at Staples refers to them as inventory tags hinting at their original intent/purpose. I’m afraid I couldn’t find a background to share on these, which makes me even more intrigued about their history. If you know or find anything please let us know! See you tomorrow with ideas on how to cleverly use tags for your next event!

 

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This Week’s Project:

Happy Monday everybody. We attended the seasons first holiday parties over the weekend and are feeling quite festive this week, so we’re going to show you multiple ways to repurpose  clear glass Christmas tree ornaments. Of course they have a fascinating history to them:

BACKGROUND:

The first decorated Christmas trees used apples, strings of popcorn, white candy canes and pastries in the shapes of stars, hearts and flowers. Glass baubles were first made in Lauscha, Germany, in the mid-19th century by Hans Greiner who produced garlands of glass beads similar to the popcorn strands and tin figures that could be hung on trees. They became popular and were made by highly skilled artisans with clay molds who heated a glass tube over a flame, inserted it into a clay mold, and blew the glass to expand into the shape of the mold. The original ornaments were only in the shape of fruits and nuts.

In 1880, Woolworth’s began selling Lauscha glass ornaments, in the U.S. They were expensive, with few Americans being able to afford more than one or two per year. On the eve of World War II, however, American companies began making inexpensive, mass produced ornaments making it possible for almost any American to have an extensive collection of Christmas ornaments for little cost. With a few modifications, Corning Glass’s light bulb machine could spit out 2,000 blank glass ornaments a minute! They were then bought by ornament companies to be decorated, packaged and sold by the dozen.

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This Week’s Project:

I’m hoping everyone had a wonderful Thanksgiving, I sure did (it was Brian and I’s first time to host and it was a success!) We thought we’d be clever this week with those leftover tin cans from your big meal.

BACKGROUND:

In 1810, the tin can was patented by a British merchant Peter Durand, based on experimental work by the Frenchman Nicolas Appert. The patent was for a method of preserving animal food, vegetable food and other perishable articles using various vessels made of glass, pottery, tin or other suitable metals. The preservation process was to fill up a vessel with food and cap it. Vegetables were to be put in raw, whereas animal substances might either be raw or half-cooked. Then the whole item was to be heated, by an oven, stove or a steam bath, but most conveniently by immersing in water and boiling it. The boiling time was not specified, and was said to depend on the food and vessel size. Neither was the patent clear on the preservation time, which was merely said to be “long”. The cap was to be partly open during the whole heating and cooling procedure, but right after that, the vessel should be sealed airtight by any means.

After receiving the patent he sold it to two other Englishmen, Bryan Donkin and John Hall, for 1,000 British pounds. They set up a commercial canning factory and produced their first canned goods for the British army. In 1818, Durand introduced tin cans in the United States by re-patenting his British patent in the US. By 1820, canned food was a recognized article in Britain and France and by 1822 in the United States.

In 1901, the American Can Company was founded and it produced 90% of United States tin cans at that time.

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#3: Twig Candle

Twigs and a little hot glue transform a cheap, store-bought glass votive into a charming natural element on your table. I love the way the light reflects unique shadows off the twigs when lit! This project is as simple as snapping twigs into appropriate heights for your votive and hot gluing them around the glass.


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#2: Twig Bound Program

A twig is a lovely way to bind a multi-page wedding program. The process is simple. First stack your printed and cut pages (I used a heavier card stock for the front and back cover and thinner pages for the inside) Next, lay a twig down and feed a thick/sharp needle through the stack. Finally feed the fine-gauge wire through the holes and twist tightly to affix the booklet.


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#1: Twig Easel

It only takes 4 similar sized twigs, some fine-gage wire and about 5 minutes to pull this easel off. First, secure the “A” frame of the front of the easel together by tightly wrapping your wire. Then add the back twig that will function as the “stand.” Feel free to add some glue to secure if the twigs are acting wobbly And that’s it, an instant, outdoor-inspired twig easel ready to display your signage.


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#1: Tree Decor

If you’re decorating with pumpkins for your wedding or party we can guess two things about you: 1)  you love being outdoors during the fall season and 2) you’re inspired by natural elements. With those assumptions we created a simple way for you to hang mini pumpkins from trees for your fall outdoor event. To execute we took fine gage bailing wire and wrapped it around the rim of a Ball jar lid in 3 spots. Then we wrapped the wire around the tree limb, once secure and balanced, we set our mini pumpkin in it’s new nest. How lovely would these be as a backdrop for your vows or welcoming your guests?


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#3: Favor Boxes

These favor boxes are the perfect size for a chocolate truffle or small treat for your guests! First measure the height of your truffle and cut paper rolls accordingly. Glue the strip of decorative paper on the outside, and spray paint the inside if you’d like to disguise the paper roll even more. Next we used a 2 inch circle cutter to create the top and bottom of the box. Finally, we added ribbon, no need to glue the three pieces together if you criss-cross tie the ribbon. It holds everything together.

Favor Box

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#2: Cute String Lights

These lights were made with the same method as the napkin rings from yesterday’s post. Once the paper roll is masked with decorative paper, I took a standard hole punch and made a hole for the light bulb to slip through. We think this strand of lights is a perfect addition to a key area at your event like a dessert table.


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#1: Napkin Ring

This week’s material is a natural application for a paper roll napkin ring. The key to using paper rolls for your event is to completely mask them with decorative paper…so your guests will never know (and if they figure it out they’ll still be impressed with your ingenuity!) The rolls were first cut into 2 inch rings with scissors and then strips of decorative paper pre-measured and cut into strips were glued down to the roll. You may find that the rolls bend slightly when cut with your scissors, but the paper covers the imperfections and wha-lah instant napkin ring.

Paper Roll Napkin Ring

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